Social Revolución: Hispanic-fluentials

I just learned I’m a  “Hispanic-fluential.”

“Hispanic-fluentials spend more time per week interacting with others online (30 hours) than the general population of U.S. influencers, called e-fluentials (25 hours). according to a study done by Burson-Marsteller.

burson-marsteller-influential-hispanic-hours-per-week-activities

I match all the characteristics and habits of a Hispanic-fluential because I’m online more than my any of my peers; I talk about brands more often than any other group  and I talk OFF-line, in face-to-face conversations, more than my  peers.  I’m thinking I’m a pretty important person or persona to brands.

So why aren’t more brands talking to ME? When I say “talking” I mean conversations in Twitter and Facebook; and marketing campaigns specifically targeted at Hispanic-fluentials. Surely these companies who want to increase revenue pay attention to the latest data regarding Social Media marketing and Social Networking, don’t they? Data like this, from this fascinating study by Burson-Marsteller:

Hispanic-fluentials also have more interaction offline in face-to-face conversations (30 hours vs. 21 hours).
Hispanic-fluentials to be extremely well-networked, as they communicate in person, on the phone or online with many more family members, friends and coworkers each day (58 individuals) than general e-fluential population (45 individuals). Among female Hispanic-fluentials, this number jumps to 68 individuals.
Hispanic-fluentials are more likely than e-fluentials to take customer service (92 percent vs. 77 percent) and recommendations from family and friends (83 percent vs. 69 percent) into account when deciding what to buy.
Hispanic-fluentials respond strongly to promotions, with 90 percent more likely to pay attention to companies who offer them coupons and 72 percent interested in companies who send emails with promotions or offers.
  • Hispanic-fluentials also have more interaction offline in face-to-face conversations (30 hours vs. 21 hours).
  • Hispanic-fluentials to be extremely well-networked, as they communicate in person, on the phone or online with many more family members, friends and coworkers each day (58 individuals) than general e-fluential population (45 individuals). Among female Hispanic-fluentials, this number jumps to 68 individuals.
  • Hispanic-fluentials are more likely than e-fluentials to take customer service (92 percent vs. 77 percent) and recommendations from family and friends (83 percent vs. 69 percent) into account when deciding what to buy.
  • Hispanic-fluentials respond strongly to promotions, with 90 percent more likely to pay attention to companies who offer them coupons and 72 percent interested in companies who send emails with promotions or offers.

Maybe these companies simply don’t know that I’m a powerful word-of-mouth consumer -or- they don’t know how to go about marketing to Hispanic-fluentials.

“Hispanics cultivate the most extensive personal and professional networks both online and offline among the efluentials studied, attesting to the potential effectiveness of grassroots and viral campaigns,” said Theresa Rice, Director, US Hispanic for Burson-Marsteller.

We spend more time online but more importantly, we spend more time OFFline, talking to each other in face-to-face conversations. I’m living proof: when I meet someone in Twitter who brings great value, I want to get to know them more, so, after tweeting and emailing each other, I like to take it to the next level and talk on the phone, if they’re not in my part of the country–or if they are, I’ll arrange a meeting. This habit has resulted in personally and professionally enriching my life.

A Social Revolución is happening in Social media. Why aren’t we hearing more about this outside of the people who are part of it?

I’ve got an hot tip for you, big companies, (if you’re listening): Check out Latinos In Social Media and review the LATISM directory of  professionals: bloggers, Social Media marketers, PR agencies, consultants, thought-leaders, authors, mami bloggers and more. It’s a unique gathering of resources for partnerships and collaborations with the people that Hispanic-fluentials quite often turn to before purchasing products and services: their Latino/Hispanic peers.

Update: A complimentary blog post was written and published today, Black Like Me? The Missing Faces in Technology and Innovation by Robin Caldwell over at the Huffington Post. Please read it and post your comments. She poses a great question.

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4 Comments

Filed under Lori Gama

4 responses to “Social Revolución: Hispanic-fluentials

  1. Pingback: Latino Rebranded: Social Media and Latinos » It’s Not About The Marketing

  2. The most simple reason as to why this is not happening: big companies and brands truly do not understand or grasp the nuances of being a Latino in the United States.

    Also, as much as we state we are Hispanic-fluentials, we must bring real-time results and data to these companies. They won’t do anything until the LATISM community can prove that spikes in customers and traffic.

    My company has been blessed to present several case studies where we can provide real-time data to these companies. In the end, it is all bottom line numbers and results. The biggest Catch-22, because we all know that we can tap into the Latino market pretty quickly and strategically, but if companies don’t believe you have the power to do this, they won’t pursue it.

    This is a great post to show some information. Now the task is to prove why you are influential and how you can deliver. Go for it! Companies and brands would be crazy not to understand your talents.

  3. When I worked for GM, I was one of the handful of people preparing and directing dealers towards internet marketing (also known as social media marketing). In 2007, the concept was new and gaining attention within the market. However, the dealership owners and their general managers were did not understand the concept. Naturally, they hesitated and even rebelled.

    When I suggested including the Latino segment in the marketing plans, I was met with blank stares. They had no clue that Latinos are the largest minority group in the US with a net worth in the billions (and soon in the trillions).

    I was amazed that Fortune 500 companies were somewhat unaware of this barely tapped market.

    I must concur with Louis Pagan. The business world at large are slowly coming around to recognizing the statistics.

    50 million Latinos in America, without counting close to 12 million undocumented immigrants and 4 million Puerto Ricans living in Puerto Rico who are also US citizens. That represents a segment that is larger than the entire population of Canada. That’s one heck of a market and one heck of a voting block.

    I am sure companies and politicians alike are diligently doing their R&D and reconstructing their business models to include Latinos in earnest.

    Expect a monumental shift to Latino marketing within the next year to three years. And especially before the next presidential election.

  4. “Why aren’t we hearing more about this outside of the people who are part of it? ”

    My thought is we are right now WAAY ahead of the curve. Maybe in 2010, you’ll start to hear more.

    “So why aren’t more brands talking to ME? When I say “talking” I mean conversations in Twitter and Facebook; and marketing campaigns specifically targeted at Hispanic-fluentials.”

    My thought here is that these companies are people who are part of old-school campaigning and are purely going after the numbers. They may not be aware (or don’t know how to utilize) those Hispanic-fluentials (like yourself), who can drive and engage this population with their pinky finger.

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